The Plot: Last week, 20 year old Indian girl named Jasleen Kaur posted a photograph of a man on her social media. She claimed he had pass obscene remarks and assaulted her at a traffic signal in New Delhi.

The Hype: Social Media and News Channels created a storm of accusations - condemning the accused of perversion and launching a merciless call to action to bring him to justice.

The Context: In a city link New Delhi where women are cat-called, molested, raped, murdered for the pure reason that men can, this was the media's way of taking a stand for a women.

The Twist: Further probing showed an eye witness account (conveniently a MAN) stating that the accused merely had an argument over the traffic signal and Jasleen was the one who abused him and effectively destroyed his reputation with her social-media war.

The Backlash: This lead to a wave of hate-videos (by men) and articles (like the one below) critiquing the media for posting one side of the story - a potentially valid point - but more critically, creating a counter-attack claim that 'men are unsafe on the streets'. One video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0s2rWhua288) claimed that this has become a 'new trend' by girls who, and I quote, "have the privileged of being victims".

The Real Story: First - to the man who made the video - no woman feels PRIVILEGED to be a victim. Secondly, if you want to hear both sides of the story - why can't women share their's on social media? What you call a trend I call a voice. Now, to the man who wrote the article below: men are unsafe on the streets?! Your logic being that one or two cases, that may or may not be false (besides the point - we are not talking about Jasleen we are talking about how you generalized all women who muster the courage to stand up to men), defy all the other instances of violence against women and lack of security? 80% of India women (including myself) feel unsafe on the streets and don't dare to step out at night out of sheer fear for their safety. I implore you to please step back for a moment and look at the bigger picture, don't use this one case as an exception that defines the norm - you risk crushing one more way that women can feel safe in your country.